Egg Donation Cycle Vs. Using an Egg Bank

Continue below for more information on which is right for you:

What is Egg Donation?

Egg Donation is the process in which one woman donates her egg or oocyte to another individual or couple for a variety of reasons related to infertility. This egg is then fertilized and implanted in the Intended Mother or a Surrogate Mother for her to carry the child to term.

***Disclaimer: Please make sure you research more about your options and how you can build your family using IVF and Egg Donation. Don’t just take our word for it. When it comes to fertility decisions, it is always best to get a second opinion and go with what you think is best for your family. A great place to start would be the CDC’s website followed by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology’s (SART) website. You can get to their websites quickly by clicking the following links:

Below is a link to the 2016 Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report from the CDC. It is important to note that this data is from fertility clinics in the U.S. and does not include any data from Frozen Egg Banks as they are not required by law to report this information as clinics are:

Fresh Egg Donation Cycle vs. Frozen Eggs?

We have found that a lot of the conversation around the internet tends to be about the differences between using frozen embryos vs. freshly inseminated embryos but we would like to take the conversation one step back in the process and talk about the difference between using fresh and frozen eggs to create an embryo and explain to potential parents the upsides and downsides of each.

There are a few differences between using a fresh egg donation cycle and frozen donor eggs but first, let’s establish the difference between an egg and an embryo so as to clear up any potential mix-up involving the terms:

An egg, or oocyte, is the genetic material from the mother (or egg donor). This only carries half of the genetic material required to create a baby using In-Vitro Fertilization. An embryo is an egg that has been fertilized by sperm from the father (or sperm donor) and has been grown for 5 days. After this 5 day period of growth, the embryo is much more stable than an egg and can either then be implanted into the mother (or surrogate) or frozen for later implantation. When it comes to the vitrification (or “freezing”) process, and embryo is more stable and preferred by Doctors and clinics.

To create an embryo using IVF, we can use two options:

Fresh Egg Donation Cycle

This refers to the process in which an Egg Donor is chosen by Parents and then begins the Donation Cycle after being chosen to retrieve her eggs. Once the Donor’s eggs have been retrieved they will then be fertilized with either the father’s sperm or a Donor’s sperm to create an embryo. After day 5, this embryo can then be implanted in the Intended Mother or a Surrogate Mother to carry the child to term, and can also be frozen as well. With this option, eggs are never frozen.

Pros of Fresh Donation Cycles:

  • Tend to get a higher amount of retrieved Eggs.
  • All eggs retrieved in the cycle belong to you and can be saved for later use if necessary.
  • Higher percentage in transfers resulting in live births.
  • 4 decades of being used in the infertility field.
  • Eggs are never frozen and avoid any potential damage from vitrification.
  • Highest quality eggs from the retrieval are used.
  • Use of fertility drugs for retrieval potentially increases fertility of eggs (especially for use with less fertile sperm).

Cons of Fresh Donation Cycles:

  • Syncing of Cycles: Between the Egg Donor and the intended Mother who will be implanted with the fertilized embryo(s).
  • Can take 2-6 months: depending on chosen Donor’s availability, schedule, and pre-retrieval coordination with Clinic.

Frozen Egg Bank Cycle

Utilizing a frozen Egg Bank means that someone is using donated eggs that have been previously frozen during a past egg donation cycle. They were either donating specifically for using at a later date or they were unneeded eggs from other cycles that were donated to the bank. These eggs are “frozen” using a process called vitrification. When utilizing this method the eggs must be thawed before the sperm can be implanted to create an embryo. Once the embryo is created they can then be implanted in the Intended Mother, Surrogate Mother, or frozen in the embryo state. Also, it is important to note that Egg Banks are not required by law to report their success rates to the CDC like fertility clinics are.

Pros of using a Frozen Egg Bank Cycle:

  • Lower cost as the eggs have already been retrieved.
  • Do not have to schedule with a Donor.
  • A woman can freeze her own eggs for later use.

Cons of a Frozen Egg Cycle:

  • Lower percentage of transfers resulting in live births.
  • Potentially not the best eggs that resulted from the retrieval cycle.

Our Egg Donation Program:

At Las Vegas Egg Donation, our goal is to provide the most value to our customers while giving them peace of mind by keeping their costs low and transparent. While Egg Banks can be convenient for those parents who are in a hurry and don’t want to wait for a fresh egg donation cycle, we find that our clients outcomes are more positive by using the fresh egg donation cycle approach. Our comprehensive Egg Donor Database is easily searchable and our team is willing to help you find the perfect egg donor that will help your family grow. Our team members can even search our database for you and send you donors that we think will work great for your family. All you have to do is send us a list of criteria that you have in a donor (such as hair color, ethnicity, education level, etc.) and they will search our database and find donors that could be a potential match.

Why we only do fresh Egg Donation Cycles:

We believe that utilizing fresh egg donation cycles results in the best outcomes for our clients. Using this method, parents have a higher chance of having a positive outcome. In our opinion, the extra cost and time for a fresh transfer are worth the decreased likelihood of a failed transfer. We have also never had any issues getting an intended mother and an egg donor’s cycles synced up. The Doctor at your clinic will do this by simple having them both start take fertility medications at the same time. This will get the egg donor ready for the retrieval and the intended mother’s body ready to accept the embryo.

Peace of mind for your finances:

While the cost of using frozen eggs may be less than using a fresh donation cycle, the possibility of a second, or even third cycle being required is higher. We have found that the cost per live birth for parents tends to be about the same using either method for obtaining eggs, which is why we prefer using fresh egg donation cycles.

To help parents ease their stress and make their decision easier, we offer a premium package that can act as a form of insurance in-case you need a second cycle for any reason. Click the link below to access our packages sheet and find out more.

Why choose LVED as your Egg Donation Agency?

Egg Donor Database

Our comprehensive database is updated weekly and can be the perfect tool to help you find the perfect egg donor for your family. Our team members are also willing to help if you need.

Partner Agency Database Program

If you happen to not find your perfect egg donor in our database we can send your donor criteria to our partner egg donor agencies that we work with and they will send us back any potential matches that they have. The great part about this is that there is no increased cost to you! Only an increased possibility of finding your perfect egg donor without doing all of the searching yourself through individual agency databases.

Transparent Pricing and No Excessive Fees

We offer a transparent pricing structure so that parents will not be hit with any surprise fees and can focus on saving up for the new addition to their family. Make sure to check out our estimated fee sheet below to see exactly what we are talking about:

***Disclaimer: Please make sure you research more about your options and how you can build your family using IVF and Egg Donation. Don’t just take our word for it. When it comes to fertility decisions, it is always best to get a second opinion and go with what you think is best for your family. A great place to start would be the CDC’s website followed by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology’s (SART) website. You can get to their websites quickly by clicking the following links:

Below is a link to the 2016 Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report from the CDC. It is important to note that this data is from fertility clinics in the U.S. and does not include any data from Frozen Egg Banks as they are not required by law to report this information as clinics are: